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Tuesday, December 23, 2008

Take testing for a certification which earns 11% more than an analyst without certification

Take testing for a certification which earns 11% more than an analyst without certification

Once we complete a degree at UG or PG level, then the Need comes to find a new job. It’s a challenging time to be looking. But you can increase our odds of success by adding qualifying IT certifications to our resume. There are number of online certification websites where we can take testing on various disciplines or subjects. One of the site I have recently found is Brainbench. Though there are many vendors that offer IT certification, with a range in cost, convenience and approach that vary wildly. One option worth considering is getting certified through Brainbench (www.brainbench.com). With over 300 IT certifications to choose from, Brainbench has been serving the IT community with vendor-neutral certifications since 1998. Regardless of the provider you end up choosing, IT certifications can make a real difference in both your job search and your salary moving forward.


Taking the time to complete certification testing has many benefits. It helps individuals differentiate themselves in a tough and competitive job market. It enables hiring managers to simplify and shorten the hiring process. It gives training departments information to develop employees’ desktop computing skills and expertise. Organizations get stronger from their technology investment by making sure their workforce has the right skills for the right jobs.

While some may question the value of certifications, a trade study of hiring managers from 685 companies both inside and outside the IT industry found that "IT companies viewed certifications at least as important as a bachelor’s degree while non-IT companies placed certifications slightly below a bachelor’s degree in importance" (ITAA, 2001). And looking forward into 2009, times are likely to be as tough or tougher than 2001.

Another very good reason to get certified: earn more money. A network analyst with a college degree, job experience and a certification earns 11% more than an analyst without certification, and 18% more per year than an analyst with neither certification nor past job experience (IT Skills and Salary Report, Global Knowledge/TechRepublic, March 2008). Completing certification also shows that job candidates are serious about career goals and continuing education.(courtesy: mail received from Techsay team)

Wednesday, December 3, 2008

HR and Interview articles

HR and Interview articles
I would like to share some more articles on Interview and HR question and answers, the download links are here

File1: http://www.ziddu.com/download/2821732/64ToughtestQA.pdf.html

File2: http://www.ziddu.com/download/2821733/HRQA.pdf.html

File3: http://www.ziddu.com/download/2821734/64InterviewQA.pdf.html

File4: http://www.ziddu.com/download/2821735/interv2.pdf.html

File5: http://www.ziddu.com/download/2821736/interv1.pdf.html

Interview e-articles downloads

Interview e-articles downloads
I would like to share some of the interview skill tips, interview question and answers and related e-articles in pdf format. This will be very useful for preparation of interview. This will boost our interview skills also. I would like to include the links which can be

File1: Interview Tips1

File2: Interview2

File3: Interview 3

File4: Interview Skills

File5: Interview 4
If you find useful, write your comments on these e articles

Tuesday, November 25, 2008

Placement guide Book

Placement guide Book
I have written one book related to Placement guide. I would like to share this book contents which are more important to job seekers as a document file. The book contents are interview tips, online and off line placement, GD tips, Resume tips and so on. The required link here.
Those who wish to share this content to their friends can also forward this to their friends at free.

Placement guide e-book

Saturday, November 1, 2008

Winning the Interview game

Winning the Interview game

This book is written by Alan H.Nierenberg gives a complete details of preparing and successing an interview. He talks about developing interview skills as a game. So it is our role to win the game for getting a wonderful job.
He gives tips on how to begin the game, rules of the game and preparation for the game. He also briefs that while the game ends, that is the winning moment, how to enjoy the winning movement. It is really an amazing book for refreshers to play the interview game and win the game. All the best.

Friday, October 3, 2008

The Career Coward’s Guide to Interviewing - Book Review

The Career Coward’s Guide to Interviewing - Book Review

The Career Coward's Guide to Interviewing: Sensible Strategies for Overcoming Job Search Fears (Career Coward's Guides) is writted by Katy Piotrowski, M.Ed. This books discusses some important interview practices. This book tries its best to completed eradicate the interview fears.

Each practice can be done with specified time duration being alone or with some friends or partners. For example "tell me about yourself question", you have to practice for the following questionnaire

are you from originally and how did you come to live in your present location? What are a few of your favorite hobbies or interests? What kind of work are you aiming for? Briefly, where have you worked and in what kinds of jobs? What do people say are your strengths? Provide an overview of your educational credentials. What is something interesting or unusual about you? (Additional “Tell Me About Yourself Ideas” provided in the book on page 66.)
Practicing these questions and getting some response from partners or friends will improve our Interview IQ also. Be read this book and get a great job without fear.

Thursday, October 2, 2008

Boost Your Interview IQ - book review

Boost Your Interview IQ - book review
This book is written by Carole Martin
Interview tips are available and prepared before going to an interview for winning a job. This book mainly focuses on interview questions which are classified as most frequently asked questions and general questions. In addition to these questions, three answers are also listed. Our duty is to read the question and answers and select the strongest, mediocre and weakest among the answer, based on the selection of any one type of answer, our Interview IQ is calculated. This will give a good guidance to select best answers for any of the interview questions which will definitely increase our overall Interview IQ. This will lead us to get a successful win for our job hunting. Try it out and get a good job. All the best

Thursday, September 25, 2008

Interview books That should be Read and Tips

Interview books That should be Read
Some the following books which give tips for various types of interview are

Credit: Interview skills that win the job by Michale Spiropoulos

Some of the tips from this book are

1 Don’t waste your time looking for quick fixes—they don’t exist. They could even make matters worse. Great interview performances come from proper preparation and practice.

2 Avoid memorizing other people’s answers.

3 Remember that interviews are about more than just giving good answers; they’re also about building rapport and trust.

4 All interviewers want to know three things:
• whether you can do the job; • how motivated or driven you are; and • whether you’ll fit into the existing workplace culture.

5. Using the four steps gives you a simple-to-follow system by which you can organise and bring together large amounts of disparate information about your work achievements, to help you form clear and articulate answers.
6. The vast majority of jobs have skills or duties that overlap. These include:
• being a good team player; • planning and organising your work effectively; • good interpersonal communication skills; • ability to cope with change in the workplace; and • ability to provide effective customer service (including to internal customers). Awareness of these allows you to anticipate the nature of some of the questions you may be asked.

7. Do not fall into despondency if you have a bad interview. Everyone has them, even good interviewees. The key is to learn from it and get yourself ready for the next one.

8. Often, interviewers are not experienced and can ask questions that are not well considered. Your job is to know how to handle both the novice as well as the experienced interviewer.

9. Believe in yourself. Now that you know what to do there’s no reason not to.

10. All the Best

This books discusses a lot of things about interview related things. The author of the book discusses all the simple techniques to tough questions.

Sunday, September 21, 2008

Top Interview Mistake by job seeker and Remedy

Top Interview Mistake by job seeker and Remedy
Common Mistakes are
1. dressing inappropriately,
2. badmouthing a former boss as the worst offense,
3. appearing disinterested,
4. Arrogance behaviors during interview,
5. insufficient answers,
6. not asking good questions

Some of the real time mistakes are
1. Candidate answered cell phone and asked the interviewer to leave her own office because it was a "private" conversation.

2. Applicant told the interviewer he wouldn't be able to stay with the job long because he thought he might get an inheritance if his uncle died -- and his uncle wasn't "looking too good."

3. The job seeker asked the interviewer for a ride home after the interview.

4. The applicant smelled his armpits on the way to the interview room.

5. Candidate said she could not provide a writing sample because all of her writing had been for the CIA and it was "classified."

6. Candidate told the interviewer he was fired for beating up his last boss.

7. When the applicant was offered food before the interview, he declined saying he didn't want to line his stomach with grease before going out drinking.

8. An applicant said she was a "people person" not a "numbers person" – in her interview for an accounting position.

9. During a phone interview the candidate flushed the toilet while talking to hiring manager.

10. The applicant took out a hairbrush and brushed her hair.

Remedy for the Mistakes
Be always with happy and smile face, do some research before attending an interview, Keep it professional, Do not lie, Know what to expect so on.

source: from a Net friend

Friday, September 19, 2008

Top 15 HR Questions

Top 15 HR Questions

1. Tell me about yourself?
2. What are your greatest strengths?
3. What are your greatest weaknesses?
4. Why are you leaving (or did you leave) this position ?
5. Why should I hire you?
6. Aren’t you overqualified for this position?
7. Where do you see yourself five years from now?
8. Why do you want to work at our company?
9. What are your career options right now?
10. Why have you been out of work so long ?
11. Tell me honestly about the strong points and weak points of your boss
12. What good books have you read lately?
13. Tell me about a situation when your work was criticized?
14. What are your outside interests ?
15. How do you feel about reporting to a younger person (minority, woman, etc)?

Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Telephone Interview Overview and Tips

Telephone Interview Overview and Tips
Telephone interview is usually done through telephone during a scheduled time. It saves time, overall cost, candidates of remote places etc. It is mandatory for preparing for such an interview in order to make so fruitful. Here are some of the important tips.

Before Interview
1. Do a research about the interviewer e.g names, their background if more than one interviewer
2. Organizing our goals, strength, weakness, achievements and keep the list well prepared
3. Practice on standard questions with friends and family members
4. Direct contact interview is different from telephone interview, so make a check on your voice, here you can show your body language, so voice modulation is very important.
5. Set a suitable place which are free from environmental noises, so that no disturbances during interview
6. Keep your resume and other particulars with you for immediate references
7. Keep with you some writing tools e.g. papers, pens or pencils

Make an impression and get success with these basic points with careful plan and preparation

After Interview


Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Interview Tips for freshers

Interview Tips for freshers
The following tips may give a boost for the freshers attending an interview
1. Be in the relaxed concentrations so that it reduces the lapses in concentrations, nervousness and self doubt while answering questions
2. Be well prepared in the subjects related to interview, it brings you spontaneous answering
3. Set some goals in order to show your skills, abilities, experiences and achievements
4. Know your questions behind the questions in order to avoid wrong answering
5. Interviewer's agenda is very important, consider that also
6. Be smart about money related questions
7. Expect answer some basic questions like "tell me about yourself" or "Introduce yourself"
8. You always use positive terms in the interview
9. Improve your Body language
10. Last but not the least, Finally give a Gentle Thank you at the end of the interview

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Be Cool In the Interview

Be Cool In the Interview
You have so may tips for attending an interview. Even though we get nervous before entering to the interview hall or during the attending of the interview. This kind of nervous i experienced while attending an interview for my promotion. Actually i knew most of the interviewer. Though i got tension before and during the interview. This can be best avoided by preparing the interview related questions and discussing with other people who attended the interview.
being cool while attending the interview.
Once i came out the interview hall, i realized that we should have been cool while attending the interview. They really asked simple questions. Even they correct some wrong answering.
Be cool and get the job

Monday, September 8, 2008

Completer Interview questions and answer

Completer Interview questions and answer
I would like to share one website which give a complete questions on Interview in various discipline. This is very useful for job seekers. It covers Placement papers, Interview question and answers, Visa questions, List of companies with its related model question paper and answers so on.
In addition to these features you can also post your question answer for the interview questions

Wednesday, August 13, 2008

Resume catcher for jobseeker

Resume catcher for job seeker
For job seeker, here is a good opportunities. Resume Catcher offer plenty of opportunities for job seekers

Let your qualifications open doors of opportunities for you, whether you are actively searching or not. This secure and user-friendly site will allow you to more effectively market yourself.

In this competitive marketplace, put yourself at the forefront of any employer search. It’s as easy as using our simple data entry tool to start!

These are all the quotes of assurance from this site.

Monday, August 11, 2008

Top ten steps to get a good job

Top ten steps to get a good job

With a qualification of any degree for applying a stop, follow
1. Create a good resume, with tips available in this site
2. Post your resume to online sites
3. Prepare well for your field of interest
4. Be with a good communicative skill and develop it
5. Be ready for a written test for technically qualify
6. Read and prepare for interview, get interview tips
7. Be ready to be and talkative for a Group discussion
8. Get info regarding the company from net or friends
9. Have a goal why do you attend this interview with perspective of the company
10. All the best to have very good job and advancement in your career

Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Entrecard with new features

Entrecard with additional features
We are all familiar with ATM and Credit cards with real world. But entrecard is the card known by the internet community. I am proud of being entrecard member for the past 6 months. It really enriched my site value in terms of traffic and money. Initially only one blog can be kept in our account, for adding new blog, we need another account.But now the trend is changed by the entrecard, we can have more blogs with one account with its linked blog feature. With this feature, I have added 4 more blogs to my account. In addition to this, entrecard have announced contest for entrecard account holder who have more number of blogs. I sum up the following features newly added,· Ebook release· Multiple blogs to an account· Blog post contest win 2000 entrecards· Multiblog contest win 15000 entrecards· New home page looks· New campaign page· Top droppers RSS feed.They have also unveiled a new ebook to know all about entrecard with its features.

Saturday, May 10, 2008

Trafficera in the Human traffic with clock race and token system

Trafficera in the Human traffic with clock race and token system




Trafficera a new era in promoting websites. Human traffic is main motto of this site.

Trafficera is really amazing website for promotion of our blogs and websites. It has many features like time credits for surfing others websites. If we browse more websites, then more time credits which in turn increases our personal value (our value in the website, it is like ranking). In the clock race once we invlove, then the result is really amazing. There are millions of trafficera members in the race.
Token system is another reward awarded by this site. More token means more value for you.We can have team members of our own or join with other team members. Groups are also available in varies categories, we can join any of our favourite groups.
While browsing, we can discuss or chat with other team members, so that we cab effectively using our browsing time while downloading pages.
Free signup are initially awarded as silver members and we can also upgraded to platinum or gold. By referals also we can earn credits. We can also buy or sell time credits to other members and earn cash. Another features are we can sell or by credits earned by us and also we can advertise our splash pages in order to increase our traffic.

BuyBlogReviews.com

Sunday, March 30, 2008

Ways to leave great and lasting impression

Ways to leave great and lasting impression
Leaving a great and lasting impression on the people you had interacted with is one of the best ways to brand yourself. Every action you make creates a little bit of impression that is crucial in branding yourself. Leaving a powerful impression is important because you will be able to create tons of contacts and opportunities.

Handshake
Handshake is one of the oldest and most effective way to greet someone. A handshake relies on eye and mouth coordination so have a cheerful smile and friendly eyes. A powerful and firm handshake will leave a great impression.

Walking
How you walk can also leave a good or bad impression . Walking properly and confidently is a great way to show that you are successful (perception!) and full of confidence. Walking differently and uniquely can also leave a lasting impression although they might think you are weird.

Voice
Your voice and the way you talk can give a great impression of how intellectual you are. Talking confidently with a clear voice is a great way to show that you are successful and professional. Talking slow and low will give a bad impression of you being weak and feeble.

Personality
Personality is a crucial factor that can impress people. If you have a great personality, you will be able to attract people to you like a magnet. Being fun, outgoing, forgiving and smart is a good start.

Dressing
Dressing is also another way to impress. Dress to impress in order to look unique and express yourself. How you look is very important since people will judge you first by how you look. Dressing is indeed very important in giving a good first impression.

Leaving a lasting impression is the best way to brand yourself. You will get tons of opportunities and contacts by leaving a great and lasting impression to people you had interacted with. Leave a powerful impression in order to start creating contacts & opportunities for yourself.
credit

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Electronic Resumes

Electronic Resumes
An electronic resume is simply your resume in a format that can be sent over e-mail or the internet. The advantage to having an electronic resume is simple. You can respond via e-mail or the web to job openings posted all over the world. No faxing or mailing is necessary.
If your resume is on a computer or floppy diskette, you already have it in electronic format. While it is true that most e-mail systems can accommodate document attachments like MSword, WordPerfect etc. It is not always true that every person or organization to whom you would like to send such a document is willing to receive in that format. Plain text ( also called as ASCII text or MS-DOS text and recognized by its three letter file extension: .txt, however, is universally accessible and, in many cases, required.
1. Steps to make the electronic resume universally accessible:
Using a standard word processing application, compose a resume as you normally would. Note that plain text format is very basic that it does not recognize formatting such as bullets, bold facing or italicized text. Consider using asterisks (*), plus symbols(+) and capital letters to achieve similar effects. In any case, make sure your resume is legible in the absence of these formatting features.
If the word processing application permits, set your margins at 0 to 65 characters (This means that your longest line, including spaces, exceeds 65 characters before wrapping to a new line). This makes your resume easier to read and, just as importantly, safe to print.
Using the “save” command (or, if you are converting a document from another format, the “save as..” command), save your document as an ASCII or MS-DOS text document. Remember to append .txt extension on to the file name, e.g. “resume.txt”.
2. Include a cover letter and be sure to note where you found the advertisement:
Send the resume with the covering letter in one. You can do this by writing or pasting your cover letter in the space before your resume. You can also send your cover letter as an e-mail message with your electronic resume as a file attachment e.g. “cletter.txt”. Use the job title or job reference number as the subject of your message. Cite any relevant job numbers noted in the advertisement.
3. Important points to be remembered and followed:
v Follow up with an e-mail or phone call a week or so after you submit it.
v Research the company and position
v Search the following: Office locations, Products and services, Customers Competitors, Philosophy, History or Recent news
v Financial info, including salary and stock
v Practice your answer to the common questions
v First you answer your question and ask questions latter (employer)
v Rehearse your interview with a friend for about 10 or 15 minutes
v Prepare your interview materials before you leave, Dress professional, Don’t forget to bring several copies of resumes, notepad and pen

Monday, March 24, 2008

General Tips for Group Discussion

General Tips for Group Discussion
A good level of general awareness will come in handy so that you aren't at a loss of words on certain issues. Understand the topic and analyse it mentally before speaking. Be clear about the purpose and content of your viewpoint. One should be able to communicate his views in an effective manner to everyone. Be clear in speech, audible but not too loud and above all remain confident.
Remember the six C's of effective communication -- Clarity, Completeness, Conciseness, Confidence, Correctness and Courtesy. You should mantain eye contact with all others in the group and not focus on a particular person for he may benefit from that. Be responsive to ideas from other people and seem to be very receptive and open-minded but don't allow others to change your own viewpoint..
Starting the discussion is considered to be good however it isn't that important; what is important is that you speak for a period long enough for you to be able to communicate your viewpoint. Always mantain your calm and never get aggresive. If you haven't been able to talk then one can cut in saying "Excuse me, but what I think is .........." or something of that sort.
Never lose your temper and never attack anyone on a personal front. Your attitude should be one of cooperation and not one of conflict. Don't lose sight of the goal of the discussion. Listen to any criticisms and give them a thought before trying to defend your views.
How is Evaluation Done in a Group Discussion
Winners' skills Group discussion is an important dimension of the selection process. Any institute requires students to work with others for effective functioning. Therefore, people skills are an important aspect of any MBA program.
In today's context, the educational institutes and organizations are interested in team players rather than individual contributors. During the Group Discussion, the panel essentially evaluates the candidate's potential to be a leader and also his/her ability to work in teams. Remember that institutes are typically on the look out for candidates who will inspire to lead and succeed and for that you need to be a good team player.
Here is a sample list of skills assessed during a group discussion:
Leadership skills: Ability to take leadership roles and ability to lead, inspire and carry the team along to help them achieve group's objectives.Example: To be able to initiate the group discussion, or to be able to guide the group especially when the discussion begins losing relevance or try to encourage all members to participate in the discussion.
Communication skills: The participating candidates will be assessed in terms of clarity of thought, expression and aptness of language. One key aspect is listening. It indicates a willingness to accommodate others views. Example: To be able to use simple language and explain concepts clearly so that it is easily understood by all. You actually get negative marks for using esoteric jargons in an attempt to show-off your knowledge.
Interpersonal skills:Is reflected in the ability of the individual to interact with other members of the group in a brief situation. Emotional maturity and balance promotes good interpersonal relationships. The person has to be more people centric and less self-centered.Example: To remain cool even when someone provokes you by with personal comment, ability to remain objective, ability to empathize, non-threatening and more of a team player.
Persuasive skills:Ability to analyze and persuade others to see the problem from multiple perspectives without hurting the group members.Example: While appreciating someone else's point of view, you should be able to effectively communicate your view without overtly hurting the other person.
Problem solving skills:Ability to come out with divergent and offbeat solutions and use one's own creativity.Example: While thinking of solutions, don't be afraid to think of novel solutions. This is a high- risk high-return strategy.
Conceptualizing skills:The ability to grasp the situation, take it from the day to day mundane problem level and apply it to a macro level.Example: At the end of the discussion, you could probably summarize the findings in a few sentences that present the overall perspective. Don't be disheartened if you don't make it after your first group discussion. The best possible preparation for a group discussion is to learn from one's past mistakes...

Thursday, March 20, 2008

Top 10 resume tips

Top 10 resume tips
1 Your resume is your ambassador to the work world.
Write your resume in your own words. It may be challenging especially
if writing ranks among your least favored activities but if you write your own resume and don't hand it off to someone else you'll be able to be sharp in your interview. No embarrassment not knowing what the resume expert meant when he wrote that smart phrase on your resume! If you do hire an expert to help you, work closely with that person to be sure your resume realistically reflects your abilities and your vocabulary.
2 Put your best foot forward:
People remember what they see first and last, so place your least important
information in the middle. Have an objective or a key word summary or both in the beginning of your resume and end your document with strong content - such as your educational background.
3 Tell war stories.
Make a list of all the work or volunteer experiences you have had that
support your candidacy for the job
4 Use resume etiquette
The word resume does not belong to any place on the document. Never
use "I" to start out a sentence. The language of your resume should be specific, clear, succinct, positive, and exciting. Make it easy for someone to contact you. Of course references are available.

5 Know what format to use.
The two most commonly used and accepted resume formats are the
Chronological and Functional. Often elements of both are combined. A chronological resume is most widely used and preferred by recruiters and interviewers. It is good for someone with a consistent work history. A functional resume focuses attention on your accomplishments and is often used more successfully if you are trying to change careers or industries or to downplay gaps in your career
6 Tell the truth.
If you lie about your education, job experience or any other
element of your work history, you will probably live to regret it.
7 Know your audience.
Your resume and every interaction in your job search should
answer the question to the employer "Why should I hire you" Communicate the information necessary to evaluate your ability to do the job. Use language that is appropriate to the industry or field, but be aware that extreme jargon may not speak to those who are intermediaries between you and the ultimate hiring manager.
8 Get some objective feedback.
Have others who have not worked as closely with the resume as
you have read it for accuracy and typographical errors before you submit it. Ask questions about whether the resume communicates what you intended. Does your resume support your claim of being qualified for the job? Does it address the requirements of a specific job description you're after? Is it need to be modified to fit the situation exactly

9 Know your parts of speech.
Action verbs are the bedrock of good writing. Use them liberally
throughout your resume to communicate your accomplishments: Developed, streamlined, pioneered, implemented, produced use your word processor's thesaurus to identify alternatives so that you don't need to repeat yourself. Key words are nouns demonstrating essential skills that are most effective for electronic formats, scanned by computers who are the first line screeners: Operations manager, project planning, data analysis. Use a Keyword Summary at the top of your resuming, choosing the top 20 or 30 words that represent your abilities
10 Hit the highlights.
Remember that your resume is only one element of your job
searching strategy. Its important and needs to get you in the door, yet covers letters, email and fax communications and telephone interactions will extend the conversation and add further evidence of your ability to do the job. Be prepared to give more detail later. Think of your resume as your personal brochure.

Wednesday, March 19, 2008

Resume Writing Tips

Resume Writing Tips
The tips listed here are the collection of wisdom for fine-tuning a resume into a winner.
1 Keep it concise:
Employers have lots to do, so don’t make the mistake of asking them to read through an unnecessarily long resume. A long, wordy resume will put off someone who is already short on time. Resumes should be one page, if possible, and two if absolutely necessary to describe relevant work experience. A two-page resume is no advantage if it’s full of information that is not reasonably to the position you are applying for. Use the space only if you need it to fully disclose your accomplishments.
2. Make your words count:
Your use of language is extremely important. You need to sell yourself to an employer quickly and efficiently. Address your potential employer’s needs with a clearly written, compelling resume.
3. Avoid large paragraphs:
Hiring managers often scans resumes. If you provide small, digestible pieces of information you stand a better chance of having your resume actually read.

4. Action verbs:
Use action verbs such as “developed”, “managed”, and “designed” to emphasize your accomplishments.
5. declarative sentences:
Don’t use declarative sentences like “I developed the…” or “I assigned in…”. Leave out the “I”.

6. Avoid passive constructions:
The passive constructions such as “was responsible for managing” can be avoided which are not more efficient compared to say “Managed” which is stronger and more active.
3.2.7. Make the most of your experience
Potential employers need to know what you have accomplished to have an idea of what you can do for them.

8. Don’t be vague:
Describe things that can be measured objectively. Telling someone that you “improved warehouse efficiency” doesn’t say much. Telling them that you “cut requisition costs by 20%, saving the company Rs.200000 for the fiscal year” does. Employers will feel more comfortable hiring you if they can verify your accomplishments.

9. Be honest:
There is a difference between making the most of your experience and exaggerating or falsifying it. A falsified resume can be easily spotted by an employer (if not immediately then during the interview process), and if it doesn’t prevent you from getting the job, it can cost you the job later on.

10. Don’t neglect appearance:
Your resume is the first impression you’ll make on a potential employer, and a successful resume depends on more than what you say; how you say it counts as well.
11. Check your resume before posting:
Checking your resume for proper grammar and correct spelling is evidence of good communication skills and attention to detail. Nothing can ruin your chances of getting a job faster than submitting resume filled with mistakes.

12. Make your resume easy on the eyes:
Use the normal margins and don’t cram your text onto the page. Allow for some breathing room between the different sections. Avoid unusual or exotic font styles. Use simple fonts with a professional look.
13. Use of standard, non-textured, fine-grained paper:
Use of standard, non-textured, fine-grained paper in white or ivory. Keep
in mind that textured and dark colored paper may not copy well when the employer makes copies to pass around to other participants in the hiring process.
If you need to copy your resume, make sure your copies are clean and clear. A poor copier can ruin even the best-looking resume. Use only copiers maintained for professional copying.
14. Emphasize what you can do for an employer:
Be specific. If you are going after than one job opening, customize your resume accordingly. It helps to tailor your resume for a specific position. Remember to only include the experience that is only relevant to the job.
15. Eliminate superfluous details
Unnecessary details can take up a lot of valuable space on your resume.
3.2.16. Don’t mention personal characteristics:
The personal characteristics such as age, height, and martial status can be avoided which do the employers not legally solicit from you. They would probably be more comfortable if you don’t volunteer it yourself.

17. List your hobbies and interests:
Your hobbies and interest can be included in the resume if you can relate them to the position you are applying for. If you need room to describe your work experience, avoid this altogether.

18. Avoid the “Objective” statement:
Your objective should be clearly articulated in your cover letter. If you do include an objective, be specific. Vague statements, such as “Looking to utilize my marketing skills” or “seeking a rewarding position” add nothing to a resume and may in fact make you appear insincere.

Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Build a Resume

Build a Resume
A resume, no matter how good, will not get you a job by itself. However, a good resume will attract the attention of the hiring manager and secure a job interview. The purpose of a resume is to disclose your accomplishments and qualifications to a potential employer. If the employer likes what he/she sees, she will contact you for a face to face meeting.
Think of your resume as a promotional brochure about you. You need to show a potential employer what you have accomplished and where your experience lies. Your strategy should be emphasizing the experience and skills that a particular employer is looking for.
Your resume is also an example of your communication and organizational skills. A well-done resume is itself another remainder of what kind of valuable employee you would be. Likewise, a sloppily produced resume is a terrific way to get yourself taken out of the running before it even starts.
When so many different employment experiences possible, there is no single resume template that works for everyone. There are, however, generally accepted ways to arrange the information on your resume to present it in the best light.

Types of resumes:

The two styles that are discussed most often are the Chronological format and the Functional format. Both have their own advantages and disadvantages when it comes to presenting your information. A third style, the combination, is a compromise between the two and has become more popular in recent years. Here, an overview of each format is given to help you to decide which is best for you.

1. Chronological format:

This is the most common resume style, and the one that employers prefer. In the Chronological format, the emphasizing is placed on the employment experience. The applicant’s job history is presented in reverse chronological order, with most recent jobs placed at the top of the list.

Advantages:
The Chronological resume is good if your recent job experience is relevant to the job you are applying for, and you want to stay on a similar career path. Potential employers can easily see what you have done, and how you have progressed and garnered experience.
Disadvantages:
Despite its popularity, there are some reasons why the Chronological format may not be right for you. If you are just entering the workforce from school, a resume like this may actually highlight your lack of experience. You may have held jobs recently that have no relevance to the position you are applying for. If you are re-entering the workforce after a substantial absence, this resume will highlight your recent inactivity. Any large gaps in your recent employment history will be evident, and you may be asked about them.
Likewise, a job history full of briefly held jobs might lead a potential employer to question your ability to remain employed. A long employment history at a single company will reveal your age to some extent, something you may not feel comfortable doing.

2. Functional format:
In this non-linear format, your skills and achievements are emphasized. Your employment history is summarized or avoided altogether. Your skills and previous relevant experience (including educational experience) are presented at the beginning of you resume. They are organized so that the employer can see how your skills relate to the job position you are applying for. It may take more effort to write a Functional resume, but you are free to highlight your talents instead of your recent job experience.
Advantages:
The Functional resume can be particularly effective if you have held a number of similar positions. It will allow you to highlight your skills rather than itemize what might be a redundant looking job history.
Disadvantages:
But the Functional resume may also raise concerns in some employer’ minds as to whether you are withholding information. This doesn’t mean that functional resumes are ignored or that they can’t be effective. But an employer looking for a clear job history may be put off by the Functional resume format, especially if you have used a Functional resume to hide your experience or a long gap in your employment history.
If you don’t have any problems with the reverse Chronological format, use it instead. If you still like the idea of the Functional format, you may want to make it more acceptable by combining it with the Chronological format and creating a Combination resume.

3. Combinational format:
The combination resume is simply a Functional format resume with a brief employment history added. Skills and accomplishments are still listed first. The employment history follows. You need to reveal where you worked, when you worked, and what your job position was. This will allay an employer’s worries about your experience, and it still allows you to emphasize your talents and how you would use them for the job you are applying for. While most employers might still prefer a Chronological resume, this is a good alternative to the Functional format.

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Body language

Body language

Avoid negative body language. An interviewer wants to see how well you react under pressure. Avoid the following signs of nervousness and tension:
ü Frequently touching your mouth
ü Faking a cough to think about the answer to a question
ü Gnawing on you lip
ü Tight or forced smiles
ü Swinging your feet or leg
ü Folding or crossing your arms
ü Slouching
ü Avoiding eye contact
ü Picking at invisible bits of lint

Making good impressions on Interviewer

Making good impressions on Interviewer

Be on time:
Being on time ( or early) is usually interpreted by the interviewer as evidence of your commitment, dependability, and professionalism.
Relax:
Think of the interview as a conversation, not an interrogation (examination). And remember, the interviewer is just as nervous about making a good impression on you.
Be positive and try to make others feel comfortable:
Show openness by leaning into a greeting with a firm handshake and smile. Don’t make negative comments about current or former employers.

Show Self-confidence:
Make eye contact with the interviewer and answer his questions in a clear voice. Work to establish a rapport with the interviewer.

Reflect before answering a difficult question:
If you are unsure how to answer a question, you might reply with another question. For example, if the interviewer asks you what salary you expect, try answering by saying, “That is a good question. What are you planning to pay for your best candidate?”
When it is your turn, ask the questions you have prepared in advance:
These should cover any information about the company and nature of job, you could not find in your own search.
Do not ask any questions that raise red flags:
Ask, “Is relocation a requirement?” and the interviewer may assume that you do not want to relocate at all. Too many questions about vacation may cause the interviewer to think you are more interested in taking time off than helping the company.
Show you want the job:
Display your initiative by talking about what functions you could perform that would benefit the organization, and by giving specific details of how you have helped past employers. You might also ask about specific details of the job position, such as functions, responsibilities, with whom you would work and report.

Wednesday, March 5, 2008

Interview and Mockinterview

Interview and Mockinterview
Interviews are a lot of work and require serious preparation. Review your recent performance and have examples of how You
1) Solved a complex issue,
2) Displayed leadership,
3) Exhibited team spirit.
Focus on accomplishments. Review in detail the requirements of this new post. Wear a nice suit and be clean-shaved. Anticipate possible questions and have some well prepared responses.
Be ready to ASK GOOD QUESTIONS.nervous is natural, especially for an important experience you are about to go through.
Some suggestions:- Review the company, the division and the people you are going to work for. Learn as much about them, their products, their vision, their mission, etc... Study online resources for this information, but also get on the phone, even seek meetings (informal ones) with others in the company, or with those who know the company. This is considered a normal/natural part of your job seeking homework, by the way. Learn all you can, as it’s in your best interest.
Mock Interview : Have one, or more, people who you know/trust to give you a series of mock interviews. What worked for me in this area (your mileage may vary!) was for my mock interviewer to set up a series of 3-5 interviews, each was to be a new/unique session and to put me through a variety of typical scenario's. I was fortunate that this was a person who does this for a living.
I was blunt and candid in what I wanted, and expected to be shown what a nice/good/effective interview SHOULD be like, but to also pointedly put me on the spot with how things can go wrong.
Each session was treated like a full and FORMAL job interview, to include suit, demeanor and complete interview set of questions, answers and discussion. Afterward there was a blunt and candid review of what the objectives for that session were (from HIS perspective), what areas I did well on, where I did poorly/badly, identification of areas of opportunity where I missed out on something good (or bad) to capitalize on, and objective suggestions for improving my body language, demeanor, language, and attitude.
In my mind, I wanted these mock interviews to take their best shots at ripping me to shreds, and see where my strong/weak points were. The reviews afterward were essential to improving my understanding of MYSELF and what I MUST improve in order to get through the interview.
For me, this proved to be a winning move.- Go into the interview eager and ready to experience it. Relish and enjoy every moment of it. You will get to do it so infrequently, that this is a golden opportunity to experience to the fullest. You may think I'm kidding ---I'm not. By adjusting yourself so that this IS your mindset and approach, you'll find it not only enjoyable, but very rewarding as well.- I'm hoping someone more knowledgeable than me can address the interview questions 'issue'. I know there are lots of resources on the internet to research the plethora of interview questions and types, etc...
My suggestion, at this point in your life/career, to not worry so much about the questions, as to what you can give and offer this company. On the other hand, you certainly should have your own list of questions, written down is fine, of what you want to know about them. Especially about your work environment, expectations of you and your time, etc... Start off general ("what can you tell me about the company") and work to being more specific ("what can you tell me about the division", what can you tell me about the position you are hiring me for", etc....").
Have one, or more, people who you know/trust to give you a series of mock interviews. What worked for me in this area (your mileage may vary!) was for my mock interviewer to set up a series of 3-5 interviews, each was to be a new/unique session and to put me through a variety of typical scenario's.
I was fortunate that this was a person who does this for a living. I was blunt and candid in what I wanted, and expected to be shown what a nice/good/effective interview SHOULD be like, but to also pointedly put me on the spot with how things can go wrong. Each session was treated like a full and FORMAL job interview, to include suit, demeanor and complete interview set of questions, answers and discussion.
Afterward there was a blunt and candid review of what the objectives for that session were (from HIS perspective), what areas I did well on, where I did poorly/badly, identification of areas of opportunity where I missed out on something good (or bad) to capitalize on, and objective suggestions for improving my body language, demeanor, language, and attitude. In my mind, I wanted these mock interviews to take their best shots at ripping me to shreds, and see where my strong/weak points were. The reviews afterward were essential to improving my understanding of MYSELF and what I MUST improve in order to get through the interview. For me, this proved to be a winning move.- Go into the interview eager and ready to experience it. Relish and enjoy every moment of it. You will get to do it so infrequently, that this is a golden opportunity to experience to the fullest.
You may think I'm kidding ---I'm not. By adjusting yourself so that this IS your mindset and approach, you'll find it not only enjoyable, but very rewarding as well.- I'm hoping someone more knowledgeable than me can address the interview questions 'issue'. I know there are lots of resources on the internet to research the plethora of interview questions and types, etc... My suggestion, at this point in your life/career, to not worry so much about the questions, as to what you can give and offer this company.
On the other hand, you certainly should have your own list of questions, written down is fine, of what you want to know about them. Especially about your work environment, expectations of you and your time, etc... Start off general ("what can you tell me about the company") and work to being more specific ("what can you tell me about the division", what can you tell me about the position you are hiring me for", etc....").
- Try this approach on being calm---think about, and continuously remind yourself in productive, enriching and positive ways that you will calmly and rationally be successful in this interview. Mentally focus on what you WANT, vice what you don't want. It’s fine to honestly self-evaluate how you are today. What is really important is HOW will you improve? What can you do better, and what are you doing about it now? Another approach is that being nervous is your minds way of telling you to be careful. You are in control of yourself. You decide what is important or worrisome.
So, tell your mind what to think and how to act. Such an improvement can occur over time when you are persistent. Think about it. Side note: I've found in life, people who focus on what they don't want, or like, as the case may be, don't see how negative that is. They really believe that by telling themselves NOT to do something that somehow, magically, the RIGHT thing they are supposed to be doing will magically occur.
It doesn't work that way. I've found when you positively and actively WANT something to occur, then make that accomplishment the focus of your attention --- it happens. I believe that occurs because you've DONE something, as opposed to the alternative of attempting to NOT do something. I believe the former is a positive builder in our lives. Be optimistic.- You gave the impression that you'd have some stiff competition for this job. Competition is a good thing. Go in with your best foot forward.
Be honest, show them that you are more than interested in doing your best every day. Convey, throughout the interview-using every question as an opportunity, to explain to them HOW dedicated you are, HOW energetic your day-to-dayperformance is now (and will continue to be for them), that you are the best candidate even with your 'limited' experience (because you can work harder, smarter, faster, with stellar results), that you are a quick learner, that you are able to efficiently and effectively apply new rules to existing paradigm's, etc.... In accomplishing this, I don't mean for you to embelish who and what you are, simply have this (the above) as your mindset, and as a way to EXPLAIN/justify and demonstrate that YOU are confident you are the best candidate. Note: In this context, I mean no offense with the reference to your being 'limited', simply saying that your skills are what they are, and that it is normal to recognize others (your competition?) have more time, and possibly even more talent/skill than you do. In fact, consider the amount of your skills, and that you are positively approaching this job opportunity as an 'asset'. You are bringing knowledge and experience to the table. You'll accept direction on what they want, and how they want it, but will also tap into your own talents, skills, abilities and creativity to do the job even better.
Review your resume, the one THEY have, the night before. Study it closely, as they will ask you questions based on what they see, and don't see. I've seen a good interview go VERY bad, simply because the interviewee wasn't cognizant of the content of their own resume. Focus on your talents and skills.
Don't BS the interviewer with smoke and mirrors. More than likely they'll catch on rather quickly that you are smart, patient and honest (desired qualities!!!) or that you aren't (bad).- Be honest regarding what you can do, and only volunteer what you are bad at, or cannot do when questioned about something specific that you can't do. Its reasonable to know your limitations, and that you can candidly explain the breadth of your abilities (and limits). If you find they focus on 'stuff' you don't know, its ok.
Expect such questions and take them in stride. Follow up with your speed/willingness to learn ..

Tuesday, March 4, 2008

Types of Interview

Types of Interview
There are different types of job interviews a candidate to undergo during the hiring process. Here are the major ones and tips on how to handle them.

1. Stress Interview:
Stress interviews are a deliberate attempt to see how you handle yourself. The interviewer may be sarcastic or argumentative, or may keep you waiting. Expect this to happen and, when it does, don’t take it personally. Calmly answer each question as it comes. Ask for clarification if you need it and never rush into an answer. The interview may also lapse into silence at some point during the questioning. Recognize this as an attempt to unnerve you. Sit silently until the interviewer resumes the questions. If a minute goes by, ask if he or she needs clarification of your last comments.

2. One-On-One Interview
In a One-On-One interview, it has been established that you have the skills and education necessary for the position. The interviewer wants to see if you will fit with the company, and how your skills will complement the rest of the department. Your goal in a One-On-One interview is to establish rapport with the interviewer and show him or her that your qualifications will benefit the company.

3. Screening Interview:
A Screening Interview is meant to weed out unqualified candidates. Providing facts about your skills is more important than establishing rapport. Interviewers will work from an outline points they want to cover, looking for inconsistencies in your resume and challenging your qualifications. Provide answers for their questions, and never volunteer any additional information. That information could work against you. One type of screening interview is the telephone interview.

4. Lunch Interview:
The same rules apply in lunch interviews as in those held at the office. The setting may be more casual, but remember it is a business lunch and you are being watched carefully. Use the lunch interview to develop common ground with your interviewer. Follow his or her lead in both selection of food and in etiquette.

5. Committee Interview:
Committee Interviews are common practice. You will face several members of the company who have a say in whether you are hired. The members of the committee may comprise of different disciplines of the company. When answering questions from several people, speak directly to the person asking the question. It is not necessary to answer to the group. In some committee interviews, you may be asked to demonstrate your problem-solving skills. The committee will outline a situation and ask you to formulate a plan that deals with the problem. You don’t have to come up with the ultimate solution. The interviewers are looking for how you apply knowledge and skills to a real-life situation.

6 Group Interview:

A Group Interview is usually designed to uncover the leadership potential of prospective managers and employees who will be dealing with the public. The front-runner candidates are gathered together in an informal discussion-type interview. A subject is introduced and the interviewer will start the discussion. The goal of the group interview is to see how you interact with others and how you use knowledge and reasoning powers to win others over. If you do well in the group interview, you can expect to be asked back for a more extensive interview.

7. Telephone Interview:
Telephone interviews are merely screening interviews meant to eliminate poorly qualified candidates so that only a few are left for personal interviews. You might be called out of the blue, or a telephone call to check on your resume, which might turn into an interview. Your mission is to be invited for a person face-to-face interview. Some tips for telephone interview:

Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Making good impressions on Interviewer

Making good impressions on Interviewer
Be on time:
Being on time ( or early) is usually interpreted by the interviewer as evidence of your commitment, dependability, and professionalism.
Relax:
Think of the interview as a conversation, not an interrogation (examination). And remember, the interviewer is just as nervous about making a good impression on you.
Be positive and try to make others feel comfortable:
Show openness by leaning into a greeting with a firm handshake and smile. Don’t make negative comments about current or former employers.

Show Self-confidence:
Make eye contact with the interviewer and answer his questions in a clear voice. Work to establish a rapport with the interviewer.

Reflect before answering a difficult question:
If you are unsure how to answer a question, you might reply with another question. For example, if the interviewer asks you what salary you expect, try answering by saying, “That is a good question. What are you planning to pay for your best candidate?”
When it is your turn, ask the questions you have prepared in advance:
These should cover any information about the company and nature of job, you could not find in your own search.
Do not ask any questions that raise red flags:
Ask, “Is relocation a requirement?” and the interviewer may assume that you do not want to relocate at all. Too many questions about vacation may cause the interviewer to think you are more interested in taking time off than helping the company.
Show you want the job:
Display your initiative by talking about what functions you could perform that would benefit the organization, and by giving specific details of how you have helped past employers. You might also ask about specific details of the job position, such as functions, responsibilities, with whom you would work and report.

Body language:
Avoid negative body language. An interviewer wants to see how well you react under pressure. Avoid the following signs of nervousness and tension:
ü Frequently touching your mouth
ü Faking a cough to think about the answer to a question
ü Gnawing on you lip
ü Tight or forced smiles
ü Swinging your feet or leg
ü Folding or crossing your arms
ü Slouching
ü Avoiding eye contact
ü Picking at invisible bits of lint

After the interview:
End the interview with a handshake and thank the interviewer for his or her time. Reiterate your interest in the position and your qualifications. Ask if you can telephone in a few days to check on the status of your application. If they offer to contact you, politely ask when you should expect the call.

Send a” Thanks for the Interview” note:
After the interview, send a brief thank-you note. Try to time it so it arrives before the hiring decision will be made. It will serve as a reminder to the interviewer concerning your appropriateness for the position, so feel free to mention any topics discussed during you interview. If the job contact was made through the Internet or email, send an email thank-you note immediately after the interview, then mail a second letter by post timed to arrive the week before the hiring decision will be made. Follow up a phone call if you are not contacted within a week when the interviewer indicated you would be.

Top 10 Interview tips

Top 10 Interview tips:
1. Great interviews arise from careful groundwork. You can ace your next interview if you: Enter into a state of relaxed concentration.

2. Act spontaneous, but be well prepared.

3. Set a goal for the interview.


4. Follow up with an effective "thank you" letter.

5. Consider the interviewer's agenda.

6. Expect to answer the question, "Tell me about yourself."

7. Watch those nonverbal clues. Experts estimate that words express only 30% to 35% of what people actually communicate; facial expressions and body movements and actions convey the rest.

8. Be smart about money questions.

9. Don't hang out your dirty laundry.

10. Keep your time punctual

Your questions with an interviewer

Your questions with an interviewer:

1. Asking questions during a job interview:
At most interviews, you will be invited to ask questions of your interviewer. This is an important opportunity for you to learn more about the employer, and for the interviewer to further evaluate you as a candidate. It requires some advance preparation on your part.

Guidelines for asking questions:
Prepare five good questions. Understanding that you may not have time to ask them all, ask questions concerning the job, the company, and the industry or profession.
Your questions should indicate your interest in these subjects and that you have read and thought about them. For example, you might start, “I read in Business week that I wonder if that factor is going to have an impact on your business.”

2. Don’t ask questions that raise warning flags.
For example, asking, “Would I really have to work weekends?” implies that you are not available for weekend assignments. If you are available, rephrase you question. Also, avoid initiating question about compensation (pay, vacations, etc.) or tuition reimbursements. You might seem more interested in paychecks or time-off than the actual job.

3. Don’t ask questions about only one topic:
People who ask about only one topic are often perceived as one-dimensional and not good candidates.

4. Clarify:
It’s right to ask a question to clarify something the interviewer said. Just make sure you are listening. Asking someone to clarify a specific point makes sense. Asking someone to re-explain an entire subject gives the impression that you have problems listening or comprehending. For example, you can preface a clarifying question by saying: “You mentioned that HM company does … Can you tell me how that works in practice?”

Tuesday, February 19, 2008

Frequently Asked Interview Questions

Frequently Asked Interview Questions
You've probably read all the job search books and reviewed your answers for the standard questions you expect to be asked on an interview. But, what about those questions from left field? The ones you didn't expect. These can be the most difficult because they will demonstrate how well you think on your feet. They may also be so charming or disarming that you may fall prey to the interviewer's trap and reveal aspects of yourself or your personality that you weren't prepared to come clean about. By rehearsing interview questions, you will become more familiar with your own qualifications and will be well prepared to demonstrate how you can benefit an employer. Here some of the Quirky Interview Questions and How to Weasel Out of Them are listed:
1. ”Tell me about yourself “
Make a short, organized statement of your education and professional achievements and professional goals. Then, briefly describe your qualifications for the job and the contributions you could make to the organization.

2. "What are you reading lately?"
It is best to think always in terms of how the question relates to the job at hand. Better than proposing novels you are reading would be law related journals and books that are hot in your field. While you might just find an interviewer who understands your taste in literature, the question really suggests that the interviewer wants to know how up-to-date you are in the field.

3.”What are your best skills”
If you have sufficiently researched your organization, you should be able to imagine what skills the company values. List them, then give examples where you have demonstrated these skills.

4. “Why do you want to work here?” or “What about our company interests you?” It is very important to answer these questions clearly and with enthusiasm. Show the interviewer your interest in the company. Share what you learned about the job, the company and the industry through your own research. Talk about how your professional skills will benefit the company. Unless your work is in sales, your answer should never be simply “money”. The interviewer will wonder if your really care about the job.
5. “What is your major weakness?”
This is a very common question. If you say you have no weaknesses, you come off looking arrogant. If you use humor here, you may appear too flippant. This is a difficult question and the interviewer wants to see how you handle it. Use a weakness that can otherwise be seen as a strength. Never fall into the trap of seeing the interviewer as mother/father/confessor and offering up something that is important to the job! A good example could be: "I have difficulty working with people who don't pull their weight. I have high standards for my work and I expect others to have high standards too. I'm learning to speak up and request that others contribute more completely long before I start getting angry about a situation that is unequal." On the other hand, you might say: “I often worry too much over my work. Sometimes I work late to make sure the job is done well”. Also supply a solution or a way in which you are dealing with your weakness.
6. “Do you prefer to work by yourself or with others?”
The ideal answer is one of flexibility. However, be honest. Give examples describing how you have worked in both situations.

7.”What are your career goals?” or “What are your future plans?”
The interviewer wants to know if your plans and the company’s goals are compatible. Let him know that you are ambitious enough to plan ahead. Talk about your desire to learn and improve your performance, and be as specific as possible about meeting the goals you have set for yourself.
8.”Why did you leave your last job?”
The interviewer may want to know if you had any problems on your last job. If you did not have any problems, simply give a reason, such as: relocated away from job; company went off business; laid off; no possibility of advancement; wanted a job
better suited to your skills.
If you did have problems, be honest. Show that you can accept responsibility and learn from your mistakes. You should explain any problems you had (or still have) with an employer, but don’t describe that employer in negative terms. Demonstrate that it was a learning experience that will not affect your future work.

9 “Do you date a lot?” [Question asked by a female personnel officer in a US defense company]

This question offers its own challenge. This question looks different because one female is asking another, you still need to answer the question in a way that satisfies the concern. A good response would be, "If you are concerned that my personal life could take precedence over my work life, I want to assure you that I am dedicated to my work. By the same token, I strive to maintain a balanced life and find numerous ways to spend my leisure time fruitfully." This answers the question without invading your privacy.

10. Why are you here today? [Asked by an interviewer at an investment bank, when he entered his office]

'Why are you here today’ offers you the opportunity to explain your enthusiasm for the job. It is not such a quirky question if you don't take it at face value. It is important when interviewing to lighten up a bit and not analyze the worthiness of each question you are asked. Look for ways to respond that will improve the rapport between you and the interviewer and demonstrate your strengths in being the candidate for the job. "I am here to discuss with you my candidacy for the position of ________. Would you like to hear an overview of my background?" (It is also conceivable that the person was interviewing that day for more than one position.)

11. “Would you rather be a small fish in a big pond or a big fish in a small pond?”
Sounds like you handled the answer well, but you need to be aware of the context in which you are responding. If you are interviewing for a large Fortune 500 firm, you'd be fine. But if you are interviewing for a small, entrepreneurial organization, you might come off as if you are too good for the company. There is no best answer- only the one that is most appropriate for the job in question and the situation in which it occurs.

12. “What are your hobbies?” and “Do you play any sports?”
The interviewer may be looking for evidence of your job skills outside of your professional experience. For example, hobbies such as chess or bridge demonstrate analytical skills. Reading, music, and painting are creative hobbies. Individual sports show determination and stamina, while group sport activities may indicate you are comfortable working as part of a team.
Also, the interviewer might simply be curious as to whether you have a life outside of work. Employees who have creative or athletic outlets for their stress are often healthier, happier and more productive.

13. “What have I forgotten to ask?”
Use this as a chance to summarize your good characteristics and attributes and how they may be used to benefit the organization. Convince the interviewer that you understand the job requirements and that you can succeed.

14. "Where would you like to be Five years from now"
Your instincts are right! Always think of the question behind the question. What do they really want to know? "Five years from now I see myself continuing to work hard and doing the best possible job I can." This answer tells the interviewer that you are a hard worker and that you have high standards. You might also offer a caveat that you intend to continue learning, growing and adding value in your field.

15. Salary related questions:
How much are you looking for?

Answer with a question, i.e., "What is the salary range for similar jobs in your company?" If they don't answer, then give a range of what you understand you are worth in the marketplace.

What do you know about our company?

Do your homework before the interview! Spend some time online or at the library researching the company. Find out as much as you can, including products, size, income, reputation, image, management talent, people, skills, history and philosophy. Project an informed interest; let the interviewer tell you about the company.

How much do you expect, if we offer this position to you?

Be careful; the market value of the job may be the key answer, e.g., "My understanding is that a job like the one you're describing may be in the range of Rs.______."

What kind of salary are you worth?

Have a specific figure in mind ... don't be hesitant.

16. Qualification related questions:
What can you do for us that someone else can’t do?
What qualifications do you have that relate to the position?
What new skills or capabilities have you developed recently?
Give me an example from a previous job where you have shown initiative.
What have been your greatest accomplishments recently?
What is important to you in a job?
What motivates you in your work?
What have you been doing since your last job?
What qualities do you find important with a co-worker?
17. Career goals related questions:
If you could start your career again, what would you do differently?

Nothing ... I am happy today, so I don't want to change my past.

What career options do you have at the moment?

"I see three areas of interest..." Relate those to the position and industry.

How would you describe the essence of success? According to your definition of success, how successful have you been so far?

Think carefully about your answer and relate it to your career accomplishments.

Other questions:

How will you judge yourself successful? How will you achieve success?
What type of position are you interested in?
How will this job fit in your career plan?
What do you expect from this job?
Do you have a location preference?
Can you travel?
What hours can you work?
When could you start?

18. Experience related questions:

What have you learned from your past jobs?
What were your biggest responsibilities?
What specific skills acquired or used in previous jobs relate to this position?
How do your previous experience relate to this position?
What did you like most/least about your last job?
Whom may we contact for references?

19. Education related questions:

How do you think your education has prepared you for this position?
What were your favorite activities at school?
Why did you choose your major?
Do you plan to continue your educations?
Explain about your project work done at college.

Friday, February 15, 2008

INTERVIEW SKILLS AND PREPARATION

INTERVIEW SKILLS
Most of the companies have two levels of interviews as follows
1. Technical interview.
2. HR interview.
The basic requirement to clear the interview level is to possess very strong and appealing communication skills. Moreover inter-personal relationship and gestures are areas to be focused while preparing for the interviews. However in the preparatory period, a detail study of oneself both academically and socially should be made. It is because of the fact that the first question in any interview is “Tell me about yourself ”. The answer for this should be written and corrected to the perfect level possible. Resume preparation is yet another requirement to be fulfilled. Resume being the mirror of oneself, should be prepared with extreme caution and enormous creativity. The best way to do is to go through different patterns of resumes possessed by the seniors and then to arrive at a conclusion. The books to be followed appearing for a particular company (e.g. is given) for the campus placement proceess are as follows:

1. YASHWANT KANETKAR SERIES
a. Let us C.
b. Go through C.
c. Exploring C.
d. Pointers in C.
e. Hidden Treasures of C.
f. Test your C skills.

2. FIELD OF INTEREST (recommended)
a. Digital electronics-Salivahanan.
b. Microprocessor- Ramesh Gaonkar.
c. Transducer engineering –Sawhney, Renganathan.

3. PROJECTS AND PAPERS
A detailed understanding of the projects and the papers will be required. Apart from knowing the block diagrams and the specifications of various components used, an optimized or normalized design for the same should be known clearly.
At least 10 mock interviews have been conducted by the seniors, which are of immense help in finding the faults and transforming ourselves to meet the various requirements of the corporate world.

IMPORTANT GROUP DISCUSSION TOPICS

IMPORTANT GROUP DISCUSSION TOPICS
Even though this particular step of placement process is not followed by all the companies, this is considered as an important assignment to be fulfilled, before taking up the actual process. Apart from creating awareness about the actual process of placement, GDs provide a ground in which ideas of various students over different disciplines and various fields is shared. Also this is considered as an important tool for developing the communication skills of the candidates. Moreover leadership qualities and team-spirit are also developed only through GDs. The topics cover various levels of knowledge from panchayats to UNO, from Montessori to Massachusetts and culture, current affairs, inter-national events, engineering responsibilities and many more across various geographies. Some of the topics are given below

1 BPO- boon or bane
2 Entrance cancellation
3 Indo China Competition
4 India in world cricket
5 Olympic medal-why not for India
6 Bribery-Cause, Effect & Remedy
7 Religion & Society
8 Indian Economy & Business
9 Nuclear Deal- Boon or Bane
10 Iraq War & Sadaam Hussain
11 Terrorism - cause & remedy
12 Product & Service oriented-Stable Economy?
13 Education System & Reforms required
14 Dowry system
15 Bhopal Tragedy-Root cause
16 Westernisation is a Culture degradation?
17 Mobile phones-merits & demerits
18 MBA Vs Engineering
19 constitutional changes required
20 Effect of films on youth
21 Industrial growth in India
22 Indian Vs Western Engineering
23 IT industries &its effects on culture
24 Ethics for Engineers
Reading news papers (preferably HINDU), journals, magazines and keeping oneself abreast of time and aware of what is happening around him is the best way of preparing group discussions.

Thursday, February 14, 2008

CAMPUS TO CORPORATE

CAMPUS TO CORPORATE
All the articles that came your way so far to read said about how to get into the corporate world, here is the article that would give you a fair idea of how the corporate world would be for a fresher and what it takes to enter it as the kid and make it a win-win situation. This article is specially aimed at people seeking the answers to questions like what all have I to transform to meet the corporate requirements? ,how to fit into the corporate culture and be a successful corporate?, and of course the points you have to look out and get into your mind and start transforming because you are all going to be corporate with in a year or two, and one or two years is a very short time to get your self practiced. So read on and start now!

"Making the transition from college to work is often more traumatic than entering college and leaving home for the first time. This pivotal point in our lives is not marked with just one or two changes but an onslaught of new and different requirements."
One of the greatest challenges in making this transition will be handling the tricky dichotomies of the corporate setting. For example, you will need to have confidence in your ability to perform the job, yet demonstrate the fact that you understand you still have much to learn. You'll need to blend into your new environment, yet demonstrate the unique talents that make you stand out among your peers. And, you will need to be able to work effectively on your own while contributing as a member of the team.
Successfully managing these challenges is sure to be difficult and downright frustrating. But, conquering them is vital to becoming a bona fide professional. Here are some strategies to help you along the way.
Learn the Culture
Every company has its own culture and your number one priority should be to understand it and blend into it, without compromising your own professional goals. In essence, this means learning the subtle differences between policies and politics.
Policies refer to the written rules and standard procedures for getting things done. During the first weeks of employment, you'll be required to read a mountain of materials, including (but not limited to) the employee handbook, company policies, standard operating procedures, organizational charts and annual reports. And you thought school was out---not! Just like the textbooks from your not-so-distant past, this material is meant to educate you about the basics. By reading them, you'll gain useful knowledge about what you will do in your job. Keep them handy so that you may refer to them often.
Politics, on the other hand, refer to the unwritten rules of how things are done or not done, and understanding them could set you apart from your co-workers, particularly when plum assignments are given out, during performance appraisal time and when promotions or layoffs are imminent. The secret to becoming politically savvy in your new environment is two-fold. First, observe everyone around you, especially the top performers. How do they dress? How do they communicate ideas? How do they interact with others, especially with the boss? And, how do they behave in meetings?
Also, gain insight about work place politics by simply asking around…but not in so many words. Meet with your boss to discuss what his or her specific expectations are of you and exactly how meeting them translates into achieving your performance standards. Talk to your co-workers informally about who the key players are, your boss' work and management styles and ‘hot' topics as far as job performance is concerned. Don't take anything for granted, including what might seem like minor issues such as lunch hours or use of office supplies because ultimately, what you perceive as minor might be your boss' biggest pet peeve (or vice-versa). Remember, being politically savvy on-the-job can help you reach your goals and those of your employer, while keeping your credibility intact.
Establish and Maintain Relationships
Cordell Jones, a 1996 graduate who landed a job as a software test engineer at Microsoft learned first-hand the importance of mentors. Jones had been confident that his new job assignments would be similar to the school projects he worked on in the computer science department at Tuskegee University. But, that wasn't the case. He'd had long lead times for project due dates at school and he could always go to a book or professor for reference and help. However, much of what he has done at Microsoft is breaking new ground on technologies for which the book has yet to be written.
"Fortunately, I was able to meet people at Microsoft that were willing to mentor me and guide me in the proper direction for how I should approach this issue. Mentorship is a key to success," said Jones, who has also held positions as software test lead, program manager and is now a lead program manager. "After working with mentors, I realized it wasn't an issue of not being able to find assistance or read a document, but I needed to approach my testing from a different angle. There were many company practices and resources available that helped make my job easier but I needed someone who wanted to help me get off to a good start."
Be Aware of Stereotypes
"Many collegians face the possibility of being subjected to dealing with stereotypes regarding our level of intelligence when it comes to us applying, interviewing and getting the job," said Kenneth Turner, Academic Advisor at Augsburg College in Minnesota. However, once we are selected for the role, we will have the chance to show that we can do it."
Communication skills are a key factor in demonstrating a high level of professionalism. You should be able to communicate well with everyone above you, below you and beside you. "There's nothing worse than hearing a new hire speak to a supervisor as though they were shooting the breeze with a friend from their neighborhood," Turner added. "Nobody is saying ‘sell out who you are,' however, understand that your level of communication can prevent you from climbing the ladder of success." Remember that professionalism also includes how others perceive your behavior.

When all is said and done, don't let stereotypes discourage you from making a difference. "New grads have something that many companies are looking for; fresh new ideas and attitudes," encouraged Hightower, who is also the Executive Director of Hightower Scholars, Inc. "If appropriate, make suggestions and present alternate plans that are well thought out and in line with the company's mission. However, don't be too eager to criticize. Learn to listen with the hopes of incorporating at least one of your ideas into the current plan and know that respect is earned by your conduct as well as your track record."
Be a Student of Your Trade
"When you first graduate from college, you feel like, ‘This is it. Now I get a job and this is my life.' To some extent, that is true. But you're still young enough to spend some time figuring out where you want to be,"
To this end, career experts will agree that new grads should never stop learning. "One thing I have noticed is that often new entrants into the job market forget to foster their professional development - they are so happy about landing that job and exhausted from completing those grueling college years - that they fail to assess and care about the development opportunities offered by their new employer,"
New professionals should investigate such possibilities as in-house training, educational travel, memberships in professional associations and continuing academic education. "They can be critical to the career development and recognition you need to succeed in today's world of work,"
Making the transition from college life to corporate life will require you to strike a balance between gaining respect from your colleagues and accepting that you are the new kid on the block. Give yourself time to adjust to your new life. And don't worry. You'll survive your first job just like you survived your freshman year at college. Look at you now!

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