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Sunday, March 30, 2008

Ways to leave great and lasting impression

Ways to leave great and lasting impression
Leaving a great and lasting impression on the people you had interacted with is one of the best ways to brand yourself. Every action you make creates a little bit of impression that is crucial in branding yourself. Leaving a powerful impression is important because you will be able to create tons of contacts and opportunities.

Handshake
Handshake is one of the oldest and most effective way to greet someone. A handshake relies on eye and mouth coordination so have a cheerful smile and friendly eyes. A powerful and firm handshake will leave a great impression.

Walking
How you walk can also leave a good or bad impression . Walking properly and confidently is a great way to show that you are successful (perception!) and full of confidence. Walking differently and uniquely can also leave a lasting impression although they might think you are weird.

Voice
Your voice and the way you talk can give a great impression of how intellectual you are. Talking confidently with a clear voice is a great way to show that you are successful and professional. Talking slow and low will give a bad impression of you being weak and feeble.

Personality
Personality is a crucial factor that can impress people. If you have a great personality, you will be able to attract people to you like a magnet. Being fun, outgoing, forgiving and smart is a good start.

Dressing
Dressing is also another way to impress. Dress to impress in order to look unique and express yourself. How you look is very important since people will judge you first by how you look. Dressing is indeed very important in giving a good first impression.

Leaving a lasting impression is the best way to brand yourself. You will get tons of opportunities and contacts by leaving a great and lasting impression to people you had interacted with. Leave a powerful impression in order to start creating contacts & opportunities for yourself.
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Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Electronic Resumes

Electronic Resumes
An electronic resume is simply your resume in a format that can be sent over e-mail or the internet. The advantage to having an electronic resume is simple. You can respond via e-mail or the web to job openings posted all over the world. No faxing or mailing is necessary.
If your resume is on a computer or floppy diskette, you already have it in electronic format. While it is true that most e-mail systems can accommodate document attachments like MSword, WordPerfect etc. It is not always true that every person or organization to whom you would like to send such a document is willing to receive in that format. Plain text ( also called as ASCII text or MS-DOS text and recognized by its three letter file extension: .txt, however, is universally accessible and, in many cases, required.
1. Steps to make the electronic resume universally accessible:
Using a standard word processing application, compose a resume as you normally would. Note that plain text format is very basic that it does not recognize formatting such as bullets, bold facing or italicized text. Consider using asterisks (*), plus symbols(+) and capital letters to achieve similar effects. In any case, make sure your resume is legible in the absence of these formatting features.
If the word processing application permits, set your margins at 0 to 65 characters (This means that your longest line, including spaces, exceeds 65 characters before wrapping to a new line). This makes your resume easier to read and, just as importantly, safe to print.
Using the “save” command (or, if you are converting a document from another format, the “save as..” command), save your document as an ASCII or MS-DOS text document. Remember to append .txt extension on to the file name, e.g. “resume.txt”.
2. Include a cover letter and be sure to note where you found the advertisement:
Send the resume with the covering letter in one. You can do this by writing or pasting your cover letter in the space before your resume. You can also send your cover letter as an e-mail message with your electronic resume as a file attachment e.g. “cletter.txt”. Use the job title or job reference number as the subject of your message. Cite any relevant job numbers noted in the advertisement.
3. Important points to be remembered and followed:
v Follow up with an e-mail or phone call a week or so after you submit it.
v Research the company and position
v Search the following: Office locations, Products and services, Customers Competitors, Philosophy, History or Recent news
v Financial info, including salary and stock
v Practice your answer to the common questions
v First you answer your question and ask questions latter (employer)
v Rehearse your interview with a friend for about 10 or 15 minutes
v Prepare your interview materials before you leave, Dress professional, Don’t forget to bring several copies of resumes, notepad and pen

Monday, March 24, 2008

General Tips for Group Discussion

General Tips for Group Discussion
A good level of general awareness will come in handy so that you aren't at a loss of words on certain issues. Understand the topic and analyse it mentally before speaking. Be clear about the purpose and content of your viewpoint. One should be able to communicate his views in an effective manner to everyone. Be clear in speech, audible but not too loud and above all remain confident.
Remember the six C's of effective communication -- Clarity, Completeness, Conciseness, Confidence, Correctness and Courtesy. You should mantain eye contact with all others in the group and not focus on a particular person for he may benefit from that. Be responsive to ideas from other people and seem to be very receptive and open-minded but don't allow others to change your own viewpoint..
Starting the discussion is considered to be good however it isn't that important; what is important is that you speak for a period long enough for you to be able to communicate your viewpoint. Always mantain your calm and never get aggresive. If you haven't been able to talk then one can cut in saying "Excuse me, but what I think is .........." or something of that sort.
Never lose your temper and never attack anyone on a personal front. Your attitude should be one of cooperation and not one of conflict. Don't lose sight of the goal of the discussion. Listen to any criticisms and give them a thought before trying to defend your views.
How is Evaluation Done in a Group Discussion
Winners' skills Group discussion is an important dimension of the selection process. Any institute requires students to work with others for effective functioning. Therefore, people skills are an important aspect of any MBA program.
In today's context, the educational institutes and organizations are interested in team players rather than individual contributors. During the Group Discussion, the panel essentially evaluates the candidate's potential to be a leader and also his/her ability to work in teams. Remember that institutes are typically on the look out for candidates who will inspire to lead and succeed and for that you need to be a good team player.
Here is a sample list of skills assessed during a group discussion:
Leadership skills: Ability to take leadership roles and ability to lead, inspire and carry the team along to help them achieve group's objectives.Example: To be able to initiate the group discussion, or to be able to guide the group especially when the discussion begins losing relevance or try to encourage all members to participate in the discussion.
Communication skills: The participating candidates will be assessed in terms of clarity of thought, expression and aptness of language. One key aspect is listening. It indicates a willingness to accommodate others views. Example: To be able to use simple language and explain concepts clearly so that it is easily understood by all. You actually get negative marks for using esoteric jargons in an attempt to show-off your knowledge.
Interpersonal skills:Is reflected in the ability of the individual to interact with other members of the group in a brief situation. Emotional maturity and balance promotes good interpersonal relationships. The person has to be more people centric and less self-centered.Example: To remain cool even when someone provokes you by with personal comment, ability to remain objective, ability to empathize, non-threatening and more of a team player.
Persuasive skills:Ability to analyze and persuade others to see the problem from multiple perspectives without hurting the group members.Example: While appreciating someone else's point of view, you should be able to effectively communicate your view without overtly hurting the other person.
Problem solving skills:Ability to come out with divergent and offbeat solutions and use one's own creativity.Example: While thinking of solutions, don't be afraid to think of novel solutions. This is a high- risk high-return strategy.
Conceptualizing skills:The ability to grasp the situation, take it from the day to day mundane problem level and apply it to a macro level.Example: At the end of the discussion, you could probably summarize the findings in a few sentences that present the overall perspective. Don't be disheartened if you don't make it after your first group discussion. The best possible preparation for a group discussion is to learn from one's past mistakes...

Thursday, March 20, 2008

Top 10 resume tips

Top 10 resume tips
1 Your resume is your ambassador to the work world.
Write your resume in your own words. It may be challenging especially
if writing ranks among your least favored activities but if you write your own resume and don't hand it off to someone else you'll be able to be sharp in your interview. No embarrassment not knowing what the resume expert meant when he wrote that smart phrase on your resume! If you do hire an expert to help you, work closely with that person to be sure your resume realistically reflects your abilities and your vocabulary.
2 Put your best foot forward:
People remember what they see first and last, so place your least important
information in the middle. Have an objective or a key word summary or both in the beginning of your resume and end your document with strong content - such as your educational background.
3 Tell war stories.
Make a list of all the work or volunteer experiences you have had that
support your candidacy for the job
4 Use resume etiquette
The word resume does not belong to any place on the document. Never
use "I" to start out a sentence. The language of your resume should be specific, clear, succinct, positive, and exciting. Make it easy for someone to contact you. Of course references are available.

5 Know what format to use.
The two most commonly used and accepted resume formats are the
Chronological and Functional. Often elements of both are combined. A chronological resume is most widely used and preferred by recruiters and interviewers. It is good for someone with a consistent work history. A functional resume focuses attention on your accomplishments and is often used more successfully if you are trying to change careers or industries or to downplay gaps in your career
6 Tell the truth.
If you lie about your education, job experience or any other
element of your work history, you will probably live to regret it.
7 Know your audience.
Your resume and every interaction in your job search should
answer the question to the employer "Why should I hire you" Communicate the information necessary to evaluate your ability to do the job. Use language that is appropriate to the industry or field, but be aware that extreme jargon may not speak to those who are intermediaries between you and the ultimate hiring manager.
8 Get some objective feedback.
Have others who have not worked as closely with the resume as
you have read it for accuracy and typographical errors before you submit it. Ask questions about whether the resume communicates what you intended. Does your resume support your claim of being qualified for the job? Does it address the requirements of a specific job description you're after? Is it need to be modified to fit the situation exactly

9 Know your parts of speech.
Action verbs are the bedrock of good writing. Use them liberally
throughout your resume to communicate your accomplishments: Developed, streamlined, pioneered, implemented, produced use your word processor's thesaurus to identify alternatives so that you don't need to repeat yourself. Key words are nouns demonstrating essential skills that are most effective for electronic formats, scanned by computers who are the first line screeners: Operations manager, project planning, data analysis. Use a Keyword Summary at the top of your resuming, choosing the top 20 or 30 words that represent your abilities
10 Hit the highlights.
Remember that your resume is only one element of your job
searching strategy. Its important and needs to get you in the door, yet covers letters, email and fax communications and telephone interactions will extend the conversation and add further evidence of your ability to do the job. Be prepared to give more detail later. Think of your resume as your personal brochure.

Wednesday, March 19, 2008

Resume Writing Tips

Resume Writing Tips
The tips listed here are the collection of wisdom for fine-tuning a resume into a winner.
1 Keep it concise:
Employers have lots to do, so don’t make the mistake of asking them to read through an unnecessarily long resume. A long, wordy resume will put off someone who is already short on time. Resumes should be one page, if possible, and two if absolutely necessary to describe relevant work experience. A two-page resume is no advantage if it’s full of information that is not reasonably to the position you are applying for. Use the space only if you need it to fully disclose your accomplishments.
2. Make your words count:
Your use of language is extremely important. You need to sell yourself to an employer quickly and efficiently. Address your potential employer’s needs with a clearly written, compelling resume.
3. Avoid large paragraphs:
Hiring managers often scans resumes. If you provide small, digestible pieces of information you stand a better chance of having your resume actually read.

4. Action verbs:
Use action verbs such as “developed”, “managed”, and “designed” to emphasize your accomplishments.
5. declarative sentences:
Don’t use declarative sentences like “I developed the…” or “I assigned in…”. Leave out the “I”.

6. Avoid passive constructions:
The passive constructions such as “was responsible for managing” can be avoided which are not more efficient compared to say “Managed” which is stronger and more active.
3.2.7. Make the most of your experience
Potential employers need to know what you have accomplished to have an idea of what you can do for them.

8. Don’t be vague:
Describe things that can be measured objectively. Telling someone that you “improved warehouse efficiency” doesn’t say much. Telling them that you “cut requisition costs by 20%, saving the company Rs.200000 for the fiscal year” does. Employers will feel more comfortable hiring you if they can verify your accomplishments.

9. Be honest:
There is a difference between making the most of your experience and exaggerating or falsifying it. A falsified resume can be easily spotted by an employer (if not immediately then during the interview process), and if it doesn’t prevent you from getting the job, it can cost you the job later on.

10. Don’t neglect appearance:
Your resume is the first impression you’ll make on a potential employer, and a successful resume depends on more than what you say; how you say it counts as well.
11. Check your resume before posting:
Checking your resume for proper grammar and correct spelling is evidence of good communication skills and attention to detail. Nothing can ruin your chances of getting a job faster than submitting resume filled with mistakes.

12. Make your resume easy on the eyes:
Use the normal margins and don’t cram your text onto the page. Allow for some breathing room between the different sections. Avoid unusual or exotic font styles. Use simple fonts with a professional look.
13. Use of standard, non-textured, fine-grained paper:
Use of standard, non-textured, fine-grained paper in white or ivory. Keep
in mind that textured and dark colored paper may not copy well when the employer makes copies to pass around to other participants in the hiring process.
If you need to copy your resume, make sure your copies are clean and clear. A poor copier can ruin even the best-looking resume. Use only copiers maintained for professional copying.
14. Emphasize what you can do for an employer:
Be specific. If you are going after than one job opening, customize your resume accordingly. It helps to tailor your resume for a specific position. Remember to only include the experience that is only relevant to the job.
15. Eliminate superfluous details
Unnecessary details can take up a lot of valuable space on your resume.
3.2.16. Don’t mention personal characteristics:
The personal characteristics such as age, height, and martial status can be avoided which do the employers not legally solicit from you. They would probably be more comfortable if you don’t volunteer it yourself.

17. List your hobbies and interests:
Your hobbies and interest can be included in the resume if you can relate them to the position you are applying for. If you need room to describe your work experience, avoid this altogether.

18. Avoid the “Objective” statement:
Your objective should be clearly articulated in your cover letter. If you do include an objective, be specific. Vague statements, such as “Looking to utilize my marketing skills” or “seeking a rewarding position” add nothing to a resume and may in fact make you appear insincere.

Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Build a Resume

Build a Resume
A resume, no matter how good, will not get you a job by itself. However, a good resume will attract the attention of the hiring manager and secure a job interview. The purpose of a resume is to disclose your accomplishments and qualifications to a potential employer. If the employer likes what he/she sees, she will contact you for a face to face meeting.
Think of your resume as a promotional brochure about you. You need to show a potential employer what you have accomplished and where your experience lies. Your strategy should be emphasizing the experience and skills that a particular employer is looking for.
Your resume is also an example of your communication and organizational skills. A well-done resume is itself another remainder of what kind of valuable employee you would be. Likewise, a sloppily produced resume is a terrific way to get yourself taken out of the running before it even starts.
When so many different employment experiences possible, there is no single resume template that works for everyone. There are, however, generally accepted ways to arrange the information on your resume to present it in the best light.

Types of resumes:

The two styles that are discussed most often are the Chronological format and the Functional format. Both have their own advantages and disadvantages when it comes to presenting your information. A third style, the combination, is a compromise between the two and has become more popular in recent years. Here, an overview of each format is given to help you to decide which is best for you.

1. Chronological format:

This is the most common resume style, and the one that employers prefer. In the Chronological format, the emphasizing is placed on the employment experience. The applicant’s job history is presented in reverse chronological order, with most recent jobs placed at the top of the list.

Advantages:
The Chronological resume is good if your recent job experience is relevant to the job you are applying for, and you want to stay on a similar career path. Potential employers can easily see what you have done, and how you have progressed and garnered experience.
Disadvantages:
Despite its popularity, there are some reasons why the Chronological format may not be right for you. If you are just entering the workforce from school, a resume like this may actually highlight your lack of experience. You may have held jobs recently that have no relevance to the position you are applying for. If you are re-entering the workforce after a substantial absence, this resume will highlight your recent inactivity. Any large gaps in your recent employment history will be evident, and you may be asked about them.
Likewise, a job history full of briefly held jobs might lead a potential employer to question your ability to remain employed. A long employment history at a single company will reveal your age to some extent, something you may not feel comfortable doing.

2. Functional format:
In this non-linear format, your skills and achievements are emphasized. Your employment history is summarized or avoided altogether. Your skills and previous relevant experience (including educational experience) are presented at the beginning of you resume. They are organized so that the employer can see how your skills relate to the job position you are applying for. It may take more effort to write a Functional resume, but you are free to highlight your talents instead of your recent job experience.
Advantages:
The Functional resume can be particularly effective if you have held a number of similar positions. It will allow you to highlight your skills rather than itemize what might be a redundant looking job history.
Disadvantages:
But the Functional resume may also raise concerns in some employer’ minds as to whether you are withholding information. This doesn’t mean that functional resumes are ignored or that they can’t be effective. But an employer looking for a clear job history may be put off by the Functional resume format, especially if you have used a Functional resume to hide your experience or a long gap in your employment history.
If you don’t have any problems with the reverse Chronological format, use it instead. If you still like the idea of the Functional format, you may want to make it more acceptable by combining it with the Chronological format and creating a Combination resume.

3. Combinational format:
The combination resume is simply a Functional format resume with a brief employment history added. Skills and accomplishments are still listed first. The employment history follows. You need to reveal where you worked, when you worked, and what your job position was. This will allay an employer’s worries about your experience, and it still allows you to emphasize your talents and how you would use them for the job you are applying for. While most employers might still prefer a Chronological resume, this is a good alternative to the Functional format.

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Body language

Body language

Avoid negative body language. An interviewer wants to see how well you react under pressure. Avoid the following signs of nervousness and tension:
ü Frequently touching your mouth
ü Faking a cough to think about the answer to a question
ü Gnawing on you lip
ü Tight or forced smiles
ü Swinging your feet or leg
ü Folding or crossing your arms
ü Slouching
ü Avoiding eye contact
ü Picking at invisible bits of lint

Making good impressions on Interviewer

Making good impressions on Interviewer

Be on time:
Being on time ( or early) is usually interpreted by the interviewer as evidence of your commitment, dependability, and professionalism.
Relax:
Think of the interview as a conversation, not an interrogation (examination). And remember, the interviewer is just as nervous about making a good impression on you.
Be positive and try to make others feel comfortable:
Show openness by leaning into a greeting with a firm handshake and smile. Don’t make negative comments about current or former employers.

Show Self-confidence:
Make eye contact with the interviewer and answer his questions in a clear voice. Work to establish a rapport with the interviewer.

Reflect before answering a difficult question:
If you are unsure how to answer a question, you might reply with another question. For example, if the interviewer asks you what salary you expect, try answering by saying, “That is a good question. What are you planning to pay for your best candidate?”
When it is your turn, ask the questions you have prepared in advance:
These should cover any information about the company and nature of job, you could not find in your own search.
Do not ask any questions that raise red flags:
Ask, “Is relocation a requirement?” and the interviewer may assume that you do not want to relocate at all. Too many questions about vacation may cause the interviewer to think you are more interested in taking time off than helping the company.
Show you want the job:
Display your initiative by talking about what functions you could perform that would benefit the organization, and by giving specific details of how you have helped past employers. You might also ask about specific details of the job position, such as functions, responsibilities, with whom you would work and report.

Wednesday, March 5, 2008

Interview and Mockinterview

Interview and Mockinterview
Interviews are a lot of work and require serious preparation. Review your recent performance and have examples of how You
1) Solved a complex issue,
2) Displayed leadership,
3) Exhibited team spirit.
Focus on accomplishments. Review in detail the requirements of this new post. Wear a nice suit and be clean-shaved. Anticipate possible questions and have some well prepared responses.
Be ready to ASK GOOD QUESTIONS.nervous is natural, especially for an important experience you are about to go through.
Some suggestions:- Review the company, the division and the people you are going to work for. Learn as much about them, their products, their vision, their mission, etc... Study online resources for this information, but also get on the phone, even seek meetings (informal ones) with others in the company, or with those who know the company. This is considered a normal/natural part of your job seeking homework, by the way. Learn all you can, as it’s in your best interest.
Mock Interview : Have one, or more, people who you know/trust to give you a series of mock interviews. What worked for me in this area (your mileage may vary!) was for my mock interviewer to set up a series of 3-5 interviews, each was to be a new/unique session and to put me through a variety of typical scenario's. I was fortunate that this was a person who does this for a living.
I was blunt and candid in what I wanted, and expected to be shown what a nice/good/effective interview SHOULD be like, but to also pointedly put me on the spot with how things can go wrong.
Each session was treated like a full and FORMAL job interview, to include suit, demeanor and complete interview set of questions, answers and discussion. Afterward there was a blunt and candid review of what the objectives for that session were (from HIS perspective), what areas I did well on, where I did poorly/badly, identification of areas of opportunity where I missed out on something good (or bad) to capitalize on, and objective suggestions for improving my body language, demeanor, language, and attitude.
In my mind, I wanted these mock interviews to take their best shots at ripping me to shreds, and see where my strong/weak points were. The reviews afterward were essential to improving my understanding of MYSELF and what I MUST improve in order to get through the interview.
For me, this proved to be a winning move.- Go into the interview eager and ready to experience it. Relish and enjoy every moment of it. You will get to do it so infrequently, that this is a golden opportunity to experience to the fullest. You may think I'm kidding ---I'm not. By adjusting yourself so that this IS your mindset and approach, you'll find it not only enjoyable, but very rewarding as well.- I'm hoping someone more knowledgeable than me can address the interview questions 'issue'. I know there are lots of resources on the internet to research the plethora of interview questions and types, etc...
My suggestion, at this point in your life/career, to not worry so much about the questions, as to what you can give and offer this company. On the other hand, you certainly should have your own list of questions, written down is fine, of what you want to know about them. Especially about your work environment, expectations of you and your time, etc... Start off general ("what can you tell me about the company") and work to being more specific ("what can you tell me about the division", what can you tell me about the position you are hiring me for", etc....").
Have one, or more, people who you know/trust to give you a series of mock interviews. What worked for me in this area (your mileage may vary!) was for my mock interviewer to set up a series of 3-5 interviews, each was to be a new/unique session and to put me through a variety of typical scenario's.
I was fortunate that this was a person who does this for a living. I was blunt and candid in what I wanted, and expected to be shown what a nice/good/effective interview SHOULD be like, but to also pointedly put me on the spot with how things can go wrong. Each session was treated like a full and FORMAL job interview, to include suit, demeanor and complete interview set of questions, answers and discussion.
Afterward there was a blunt and candid review of what the objectives for that session were (from HIS perspective), what areas I did well on, where I did poorly/badly, identification of areas of opportunity where I missed out on something good (or bad) to capitalize on, and objective suggestions for improving my body language, demeanor, language, and attitude. In my mind, I wanted these mock interviews to take their best shots at ripping me to shreds, and see where my strong/weak points were. The reviews afterward were essential to improving my understanding of MYSELF and what I MUST improve in order to get through the interview. For me, this proved to be a winning move.- Go into the interview eager and ready to experience it. Relish and enjoy every moment of it. You will get to do it so infrequently, that this is a golden opportunity to experience to the fullest.
You may think I'm kidding ---I'm not. By adjusting yourself so that this IS your mindset and approach, you'll find it not only enjoyable, but very rewarding as well.- I'm hoping someone more knowledgeable than me can address the interview questions 'issue'. I know there are lots of resources on the internet to research the plethora of interview questions and types, etc... My suggestion, at this point in your life/career, to not worry so much about the questions, as to what you can give and offer this company.
On the other hand, you certainly should have your own list of questions, written down is fine, of what you want to know about them. Especially about your work environment, expectations of you and your time, etc... Start off general ("what can you tell me about the company") and work to being more specific ("what can you tell me about the division", what can you tell me about the position you are hiring me for", etc....").
- Try this approach on being calm---think about, and continuously remind yourself in productive, enriching and positive ways that you will calmly and rationally be successful in this interview. Mentally focus on what you WANT, vice what you don't want. It’s fine to honestly self-evaluate how you are today. What is really important is HOW will you improve? What can you do better, and what are you doing about it now? Another approach is that being nervous is your minds way of telling you to be careful. You are in control of yourself. You decide what is important or worrisome.
So, tell your mind what to think and how to act. Such an improvement can occur over time when you are persistent. Think about it. Side note: I've found in life, people who focus on what they don't want, or like, as the case may be, don't see how negative that is. They really believe that by telling themselves NOT to do something that somehow, magically, the RIGHT thing they are supposed to be doing will magically occur.
It doesn't work that way. I've found when you positively and actively WANT something to occur, then make that accomplishment the focus of your attention --- it happens. I believe that occurs because you've DONE something, as opposed to the alternative of attempting to NOT do something. I believe the former is a positive builder in our lives. Be optimistic.- You gave the impression that you'd have some stiff competition for this job. Competition is a good thing. Go in with your best foot forward.
Be honest, show them that you are more than interested in doing your best every day. Convey, throughout the interview-using every question as an opportunity, to explain to them HOW dedicated you are, HOW energetic your day-to-dayperformance is now (and will continue to be for them), that you are the best candidate even with your 'limited' experience (because you can work harder, smarter, faster, with stellar results), that you are a quick learner, that you are able to efficiently and effectively apply new rules to existing paradigm's, etc.... In accomplishing this, I don't mean for you to embelish who and what you are, simply have this (the above) as your mindset, and as a way to EXPLAIN/justify and demonstrate that YOU are confident you are the best candidate. Note: In this context, I mean no offense with the reference to your being 'limited', simply saying that your skills are what they are, and that it is normal to recognize others (your competition?) have more time, and possibly even more talent/skill than you do. In fact, consider the amount of your skills, and that you are positively approaching this job opportunity as an 'asset'. You are bringing knowledge and experience to the table. You'll accept direction on what they want, and how they want it, but will also tap into your own talents, skills, abilities and creativity to do the job even better.
Review your resume, the one THEY have, the night before. Study it closely, as they will ask you questions based on what they see, and don't see. I've seen a good interview go VERY bad, simply because the interviewee wasn't cognizant of the content of their own resume. Focus on your talents and skills.
Don't BS the interviewer with smoke and mirrors. More than likely they'll catch on rather quickly that you are smart, patient and honest (desired qualities!!!) or that you aren't (bad).- Be honest regarding what you can do, and only volunteer what you are bad at, or cannot do when questioned about something specific that you can't do. Its reasonable to know your limitations, and that you can candidly explain the breadth of your abilities (and limits). If you find they focus on 'stuff' you don't know, its ok.
Expect such questions and take them in stride. Follow up with your speed/willingness to learn ..

Tuesday, March 4, 2008

Types of Interview

Types of Interview
There are different types of job interviews a candidate to undergo during the hiring process. Here are the major ones and tips on how to handle them.

1. Stress Interview:
Stress interviews are a deliberate attempt to see how you handle yourself. The interviewer may be sarcastic or argumentative, or may keep you waiting. Expect this to happen and, when it does, don’t take it personally. Calmly answer each question as it comes. Ask for clarification if you need it and never rush into an answer. The interview may also lapse into silence at some point during the questioning. Recognize this as an attempt to unnerve you. Sit silently until the interviewer resumes the questions. If a minute goes by, ask if he or she needs clarification of your last comments.

2. One-On-One Interview
In a One-On-One interview, it has been established that you have the skills and education necessary for the position. The interviewer wants to see if you will fit with the company, and how your skills will complement the rest of the department. Your goal in a One-On-One interview is to establish rapport with the interviewer and show him or her that your qualifications will benefit the company.

3. Screening Interview:
A Screening Interview is meant to weed out unqualified candidates. Providing facts about your skills is more important than establishing rapport. Interviewers will work from an outline points they want to cover, looking for inconsistencies in your resume and challenging your qualifications. Provide answers for their questions, and never volunteer any additional information. That information could work against you. One type of screening interview is the telephone interview.

4. Lunch Interview:
The same rules apply in lunch interviews as in those held at the office. The setting may be more casual, but remember it is a business lunch and you are being watched carefully. Use the lunch interview to develop common ground with your interviewer. Follow his or her lead in both selection of food and in etiquette.

5. Committee Interview:
Committee Interviews are common practice. You will face several members of the company who have a say in whether you are hired. The members of the committee may comprise of different disciplines of the company. When answering questions from several people, speak directly to the person asking the question. It is not necessary to answer to the group. In some committee interviews, you may be asked to demonstrate your problem-solving skills. The committee will outline a situation and ask you to formulate a plan that deals with the problem. You don’t have to come up with the ultimate solution. The interviewers are looking for how you apply knowledge and skills to a real-life situation.

6 Group Interview:

A Group Interview is usually designed to uncover the leadership potential of prospective managers and employees who will be dealing with the public. The front-runner candidates are gathered together in an informal discussion-type interview. A subject is introduced and the interviewer will start the discussion. The goal of the group interview is to see how you interact with others and how you use knowledge and reasoning powers to win others over. If you do well in the group interview, you can expect to be asked back for a more extensive interview.

7. Telephone Interview:
Telephone interviews are merely screening interviews meant to eliminate poorly qualified candidates so that only a few are left for personal interviews. You might be called out of the blue, or a telephone call to check on your resume, which might turn into an interview. Your mission is to be invited for a person face-to-face interview. Some tips for telephone interview:

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